Meet me at the Church

I wasn't sure what to make of this large, 10x12, Edwardian photo found at the Maumee Antique Mall in Ohio.  Was the man a pastor of this church?  Upon reading the writing on the reverse "Edward J. Stock, Defiance, Ohio, March 1st, 1907, Rev. B. H. Morse, Pastor," I suspected this was a memorial photo... Continue Reading →

Kirkley’s Snap Shot

This cabinet card was found in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  The sitter was James Buchanan Kirkley, born April 15, 1856, in Indiana.  His image was captured by Felix Schanz, a native of France, who came to Fort Wayne in the 1880s.  According to the following article, Schanz' studio, at 112 Calhoun, opened in 1889. James Kirkley... Continue Reading →

Hattie’s Hats

Harriet Bowden, or Hattie Bowden, as she was identified on the back of this cabinet card, was born in 1869 in New York.  Sometime after 1873 her parents, William and Louisa, relocated to Ohio.  In her early twenties, when this photo was taken, Hattie worked for the Western Suspender Company and as a Milliner in... Continue Reading →

She Wore Mittens

This is a cabinet card photograph, identified on the back as "Mabel F. Greene, 5 years old, 1883."  The photographer was W.C. Foote of Flint, Michigan.  I was attracted to the image because I'm a knitter, and the little girl is wearing knitted mittens. I imagined the mother, a grandmother, or maybe an aunt, knitting... Continue Reading →

Isabella Moore’s Snapshot

This cabinet card was a lovely gift from a fellow photo collector.  In addition to the writing on the front of the card, identifying the sitter as Mrs. Moore, a cousin from Nova Scotia, there is writing on the reverse that narrows her identity to Mrs. W. H. Moore.  I'm grateful to the relative who added... Continue Reading →

The Undertaker’s Wife

In 1896, Maggie Estella Holder, 17, married Charles Luther Thornburg, 21, and the couple settled in Farmland, Randolph County, Indiana.  Luther, as he was best known, was a farmer, but had a "hankering" to become an undertaker.  In 1904, he bought the undertaking business of W.B. Meeks, and thus began Thornburg's career as a mortician. ... Continue Reading →

The Hope of Heaven

I fell for this cabinet card the second I saw it in The Wurdeman Studio shop.  The matching dresses, the doll, the girl pointing towards the sky, combined with the fact that the sitters were identified, pushed me to hit the add to cart button. The Frey sisters, Leah Adda (10) and Bessie J. (8), sat... Continue Reading →

A Hell for the Sick

Jessie Calhoun's cabinet card photo was found in an album that belonged to Jessie Sylvester.  I believe the girls were cousins, as there are shared surnames in their respective family trees.  However, I was unable to find a direct link. Born in 1867, in Ashtabula county, Ohio, Jessie's father, Porter Calhoun, was a farmer, and... Continue Reading →

Blushing Brothers

The blushing brothers are George and James Harris.  Who's who is uncertain.  They were very close in age, born just two years apart; James on January 10, 1872, and George on March 10, 1874. On George's WWI draft card, he's said to have black hair and brown eyes.  I wasn't able to locate a card... Continue Reading →

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