The Hope of Heaven

I fell for this cabinet card the second I saw it in The Wurdeman Studio shop.  The matching dresses, the doll, the girl pointing towards the sky, combined with the fact that the sitters were identified, pushed me to hit the add to cart button. The Frey sisters, Leah Adda (10) and Bessie J. (8), sat... Continue Reading →

A Hell for the Sick

Jessie Calhoun's cabinet card photo was found in an album that belonged to Jessie Sylvester.  I believe the girls were cousins, as there are shared surnames in their respective family trees.  However, I was unable to find a direct link. Born in 1867, in Ashtabula county, Ohio, Jessie's father, Porter Calhoun, was a farmer, and... Continue Reading →

Blushing Brothers

The blushing brothers are George and James Harris.  Who's who is uncertain.  They were very close in age, born just two years apart; James on January 10, 1872 and George on March 10, 1874.  On George's WWI draft card, he's said to have black hair and brown eyes.  I wasn't able to locate a card... Continue Reading →

The Hustler

This dandy cabinet card was discovered in Goshen, Indiana.  The sitter screamed, "Take me home! I'm bold and interesting!" William Francis Hostetler, born in La Paz, Indiana in 1870,  was a hustler, in a good way.  He was an enterprising person, determined to succeed, a real go-getter. Which is why I was surprised to find... Continue Reading →

Cloudy Days Good As Sunshine

This cabinet card has so much going for it!  From the lovely studio backdrop, to the girl's big eyed, faraway stare,  to the awkward pose made to show off her dress bustle (and wow, what a bustle!)  Bustles reached extreme proportions in the mid 1880s. The back of the card is just as interesting.  The... Continue Reading →

From the Grave

Pat Cook's family portrait wound up in a sale basket in Archbold, Ohio. While the cabinet card shows a lot of wear, and the mother and daughter on the left appear ghostly pale, the overall depth and detail of the sitter's images held up well.  The balloon-like sleeves of the daughter on the right helped... Continue Reading →

Nevertheless, She Persisted

“Aunt Margret Newkirk” is written on the back of this cabinet card that was found in Auburn, Indiana. The sitter is Margaret (nee Warwick).  The inscription leads me to believe this photo belonged to Maud Kelley, a foster daughter, who lived in the Newkirk home for some years, and who fondly referred to the sitter... Continue Reading →

Unrelenting Death

This cabinet card was found in a Goshen, Indiana shop and features Lizzie and Emma Boeckling during happier times; I uncovered a sad tale during my research. Lizzie and Emma were two of six children born to John and Johanna Boeckling  of LaPorte, Indiana.  They were the middle children, with the eldest being Carrie and... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: