The Best Deductions

blog-brown-c-w-and-l

These were some of the first old photos I picked up when I began collecting.  The green and dark brown cabinet card mounts are especially attractive and I love how crisp and richly saturated the images have remained after more than 130 years.

All the photos were taken at the same studio, Mast, in Marshall, Michigan, but only the photo of the couple has writing on the reverse.  The youngest girl is wearing what appears to be the same, or a very similar, necklace as the woman.  While I typically do not buy photos without some attribution, the previous observations, as well as the fact that the girls look to be either sisters or the same person, led me to purchase all of them, as I wanted to keep the photos together.

blog-brown-child-2blog-brown-child-1The notations on the back of the couple’s card have something that I’ve come to relish in a find…a date.  I quickly realized that photos with dates, even if they have no name, are a wonderful thing to have in a collection, as you can put the sitters’ fashions, hairstyles, and accessories with that moment in time. There are many wonderful guides that provide tips for dating photos in this manner, and I often refer to my 19th Century Card Photos Kwik Guide by Gary W. Clark when looking for clues, but, having actual examples in my own collection is priceless to me.

Continue reading

The gang’s almost all here

John William Stuck
John William Stuck

I discovered these photos in a shop in Warsaw, Indiana.  Although the gentleman sitter has his name, John William Stuck, written on the back of the cabinet card, he would be impossible to identify if it hadn’t been for the second photo found in the pile.  That photo, a cabinet card featuring three children, identified on the back as Mabel Stuck, Susie Tyrone Stuck, and Clesson Daniel Stuck, provided a location of Elkhart, Indiana.

Mabel, Susie and Clesson Stuck
Mabel, Susie Tyrone and Clesson Daniel Stuck

John William Stuck was born in 1856 in Pennsylvania and came with his family, as a young boy, to Elkhart, Indiana where he wed Mary Prudence Newman.  The couple made their home in Elkhart, where they raised their seven children, the eldest three being Mabel, Clesson and Susie.  Based on how old the children appear to be in the photo, along with the fact that John and Mary welcomed a son, Bernard, in 1894, I date the children’s photo to 1892 or 1893.

In order to date John’s photo, I consulted the 19th Century Card Photos KwikGuide by Gary W. Clark.  His hair and clothing appear to fit with styles seen from 1879 to 1885.  The turned up collar, which was popular in the 1850s and 60s, was making a comeback in the 1880s. He isn’t wearing a wedding ring, which may be a clue that the photo was taken prior to his marriage in 1881.  Of course, it’s also possible that he didn’t wear a ring.

Elkhart Carriage and Harness Manufacturing

During his life, John worked as a carriage maker, and later was employed as a wood pattern maker by the Elkhart (Elcar) Motor Company.  I suspect that he began working for the motor company when it was known as Elkhart Carriage and Harness Manufacturing.

I should be satisfied to have rescued these images, but I can’t help but wish that I found a photo of Mary and the other children.  It would be nice to complete the family and keep them together.

Sources
Census records
Coachbuilt – History of Elkhart Carriage and Elkhart Auto

Elkhart Carriage advertisement

A girl and her doll

blog-wannemacher-with-doll

Some years ago during a visit to an antique shop in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, I came across this cabinet card photo of a little girl and her doll, and I couldn’t leave it behind.  At the time, I wasn’t even collecting old photos.  I also purchased a photo of the girl when she was older. Written on the back is the name Marie Nunnemacher.

blog-wannemacher-marie

Although I have a name, I can’t positively identify the sitter. I thought that the name written on the back would be her maiden name, since they are childhood photos.  However, I haven’t been able to find a Marie Nunnemacher that would fit.  I even searched the last names Winnemacher and Wannemacher, in case I was misreading the handwriting.

It’s possible that she was Mary “Marie” Wandel, born in 1888 in Milwaukee, who married Max Nunnemacher.  However, this is just a guess. I hope that someday Marie’s family members will stumble upon this blog post and recognize her.

Save

Pugs in history!

blog-37-haskell-devere

Abt. 1896

How awesome is this cabinet card ?  A little boy with long ringlet curls, wearing a beautiful dress, and the icing on the cake is his adorable pug puppy wearing a plaid bow!  And look at how he’s resting his little hand on the puppy’s paw…it’s just too sweet!  I want to know how they got that pug to sit so still. The photographer must have had mad skills.

The little boy is De Vere Charles Haskell.  He was born in 1893, grew up in Arcade, New York and later lived in Buffalo with his wife, Fannie (nee Smith).  He graduated from the University of Michigan College of Literature, Science and the Arts in 1916 and after serving in the military for three years, began a career as a bookkeeper and accountant.

blog-34-haskell-frank_elenor-nee-smith_devere

Abt. 1899

Also in the album was this family photo of De Vere and his parents, Frank and Elenor (nee Charles) Haskell when he was the only child.  In 1902, his sister, Helen Francis, was born. And look, it’s the same backdrop and the same furry rug as the earlier photo.  They must have been photographer favorites.

This image is part of an album found in an antique shop in Fremont, Indiana.  The album contains photos of friends and family of Will Pinney of Arcade, New York.  De Vere was the grand nephew of Will’s wife’s aunt’s husband.  Just a little confusing, right? I hope to feature more photos from this album in the future.

Sources:
Census records
New York County Marriages
New York Abstracts of World War I Military Service
University of Michigan records

Save

Save

Save

Jet & Grace

norton-sister-photo-edited-blog-size

This cabinet card came from a shop in Indianapolis, Indiana and was given to me by a friend who supports my love of found photos.  The two girls are identified on the back of the photo as Jet & Grace Norton.  The card carries the marking of the W.H. Butler New Gallery photography studio of Clifford, Indiana.

Research uncovered sisters, Jessie Pearl and Grace Edna Norton, daughters of Julian Perry and Phoebe (nee Linke) Norton.  At the time of the photo, taken in approximately 1892, they were their parents only children.  In 1894, their brother, Raymond Louis, was born.

Continue reading

Gran Nana

blog-kutcher-grandmother-infantabt. 1890

These five cabinet cards were in an antique shop in Auburn, Indiana.  Written on the back of one is “Grand Mother Kutcher,” on another “Gramdns,” and yet another “Gran Nana.”  Four of the photos were taken in Portland, Indiana.  The earliest image of Grandmother Kutcher as an infant has no photography studio markings.  Notice the glass baby bottle with large rubber nipple.  And look at the worn shoe soles.  Were they second hand or was she doing a lot of walking?
Continue reading