The Compositor

Jennie Murray was born about 1859 in Brooklyn, New York.  She came with her parents, John and Jermana (nee Griffith) Murray, to Milwaukee sometime before the 1870 census records were collected.  Her father was an immigrant from Scotland who worked as a sailor and a watchman. At the age of 22, Jennie married William Hawkins... Continue Reading →

Fountain of Youth

Ann and Margaret Philpot, sisters born in 1857 and 1859 respectively, grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. On the 1860 census, Ann was two years of age and Margaret was 10 months old.  Their parents George and Anna (nee Nuzum) were immigrants from Ireland.  The girls had two older siblings, Thomas and Sarah. Ann and Margaret,... Continue Reading →

The Inn Keeper

This carte de visite (cdv) is the fourth photo I researched out of what I call the Waukesha album because of where I found it, Waukesha, Wisconsin.  The few photos with names written on them are children that appear to have been born about the same time period, the late 1850s to early 1860s.  If... Continue Reading →

The Pottery Maker

The Bauer sisters, Barbara, Lucinda, and Hanna, sat for this photograph at the Gustave Kundler photography studio in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  I believe the image was captured about 1875.  The girls would have been 11, 10, and two years old, respectively. I've come to surmise that the photos of the identified children found in this album... Continue Reading →

The Baker

Hattie was born Hedwig Reuter on June 24, 1864, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  The boy in the photo was her brother, Robert.  They were the oldest children of Jacob and Ida (nee Geier) Reuter, immigrants from Germany.  Look at their matching shoes! This carte de visite (cdv) is the second photo I researched out of what... Continue Reading →

The Butcher

This carte de visite (cdv) is out of what I've dubbed the Waukesha album because of where I found it, in Waukesha, Wisconsin.  The few photos with names written on them are children that appear to have been born about the same time as this sitter, who I've identified as Louise Ernst.  Is it just... Continue Reading →

Don’t Toot Your Own Horn

Frank Horn worked for over twenty years at the Conn Company, a musical instrument manufacturer in Elkhart, Indiana.  I imagine he was the subject of many horn jokes in his day.  Frank was a stationary fireman, which meant he operated high-pressure steam boilers in the factory. Frank, his wife Ell (nee Seabourn), and their children... Continue Reading →

At Old Orchard

What a wonderful outdoor setting for a photograph.  But, does anything seem odd to you? Look at the way the family members are spread out.  I think the most glaring is the empty space next to the father.  Why didn't his son, or his wife for that matter, sit beside him?  Is this how the... Continue Reading →

She Wore Mittens

This is a cabinet card photograph, identified on the back as "Mabel F. Greene, 5 years old, 1883."  The photographer was W.C. Foote of Flint, Michigan.  I was attracted to the image because I'm a knitter, and the little girl is wearing knitted mittens. I imagined the mother, a grandmother, or maybe an aunt, knitting... Continue Reading →

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