Meet me in the Graveyard

This image was found in a basket of photos in a shop in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  I have quite a few photos of myself, as a child, visiting my mother's grave, which is why I'm drawn to photographs of others partaking in the same ritual. The visitors of Henry A. Seitz's resting place, at Lindenwood... Continue Reading →

The Undertaker’s Wife

In 1896, Maggie Estella Holder, 17, married Charles Luther Thornburg, 21, and the couple settled in Farmland, Randolph County, Indiana.  Luther, as he was best known, was a farmer, but had a "hankering" to become an undertaker.  In 1904, he bought the undertaking business of W.B. Meeks, and thus began Thornburg's career as a mortician. ... Continue Reading →

David Aker’s Snap Shot

I picked up this tintype, housed in a paper frame, in Markle, Indiana.  Writing on the back reads "Whitley Co. Ind." I find it difficult to date this tintype based on the young man's fashion.  If I had to make a guess, I would say late 1860s to mid 1870s, based on the felt hat... Continue Reading →

The Artist

This is a tintype that has been hand-colored.  It was found in Markle, Indiana.  Written on the reverse is "Mrs. Sarah Huff, Artist, Leavensworth (sic), Ind." Based on the young woman's fashion, I loosely date this photo as being taken in the 1870s.  This is a curious case, as there were several women named Sarah... Continue Reading →

The Hustler

This dandy cabinet card was discovered in Goshen, Indiana.  The sitter screamed, "Take me home! I'm bold and interesting!" William Francis Hostetler, born in La Paz, Indiana in 1870,  was a hustler, in a good way.  He was an enterprising person, determined to succeed, a real go-getter. Which is why I was surprised to find... Continue Reading →

Nevertheless, She Persisted

“Aunt Margret Newkirk” is written on the back of this cabinet card that was found in Auburn, Indiana. The sitter is Margaret (nee Warwick).  The inscription leads me to believe this photo belonged to Maud Kelley, a foster daughter, who lived in the Newkirk home for some years, and who fondly referred to the sitter... Continue Reading →

Killed by the Cars

On January 27, 1890, Emma (nee Berger) Toomey, aged 26, died after being run over by a train. Almost two years later, on December 23, 1891, her husband, Michael Toomey, was also "killed by the cars."  It’s believed they were struck because they couldn’t hear the train coming, as both  Emma and Michael lost their... Continue Reading →

Unrelenting Death

This cabinet card was found in a Goshen, Indiana shop and features Lizzie and Emma Boeckling during happier times; I uncovered a sad tale during my research. Lizzie and Emma were two of six children born to John and Johanna Boeckling  of LaPorte, Indiana.  They were the middle children, with the eldest being Carrie and... Continue Reading →

You Had Me at Fancy Yarns

Well, doesn't he look spiffy!  He's even sporting a walking stick!  I fell for this cabinet card the moment I saw it in an antique shop in Auburn, Indiana.  I was thrilled when I flipped it over and found the sitter was identified. Jackson “Jack” Milford Beams lived in Spencerville, Indiana.  He was married on... Continue Reading →

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