Phil Clark’s Snapshot

Philip J. Clark was a 23 year old bachelor, in August, 1872, when he sat for photographer, Samuel Montague Fassett, at 501 Wabash Avenue, in Chicago, Illinois. His birthday was in August, and I wonder if this photo was taken to mark the occasion.  Seven years later, Philip wed Miss Sarah E. Fletcher, and the... Continue Reading →

Students of Union School

Click on the image to view larger I love a group photo, and my favorite antique photo format is the carte de visite, also known as the cdv.  I picked this one up in the VictorianPhoto etsy shop.  I enjoy studying the sitters' faces, and body language, some seem so relaxed in front of the... Continue Reading →

With Compliments

This carte de visite was languishing in a shop in Lansing, Michigan for at least two years.  On my latest visit, I could no longer resist the urge to rescue it.  The sitter looks to be about 20 years old, and based on his fashion, I suspect the photo was taken in the late 1870s. ... Continue Reading →

Don’t call me Mozart

Harald Fredericksen, and his son, Harold Victor Byron Mozart, posed for this photo, in Chicago, Illinois. Harald immigrated to the United States, from Denmark, in 1869, and settled in Chicago, Illinois.  He married Hermina Stocker, an immigrant from Norway.  Harald worked as a clerk and bookkeeper.  The couple had three daughters, Ella, Olga, and Dagmar.  Mozart... Continue Reading →

Living with Hoboes

I admired this cased ambrotype, along with a smaller, cased tintype (shown at the end of this post), for at least a year, as they sat listed on etsy.  The seller mistakenly  identified the sitter as William Wallace.  He overlooked the next word, which I came to discover was the surname of Hungerford. William Wallace Hungerford... Continue Reading →

R.J. Terry’s Snap Shot

Born in 1860, in Alabama, Reavis Johnston "R.J." Terry was named after his father's mentors.  As a young teen, R.J.'s father, John Taliaferro Terry, lost his father and was taken in by his sister's husband, Colonel Robert Johnston.  John became a lawyer, like Johnston, and went into a law partnership with the Honorable Turner Reavis.... Continue Reading →

Blushing Brothers

The blushing brothers are George and James Harris.  Who's who is uncertain.  They were very close in age, born just two years apart; James on January 10, 1872 and George on March 10, 1874.  On George's WWI draft card, he's said to have black hair and brown eyes.  I wasn't able to locate a card... Continue Reading →

David Aker’s Snap Shot

I picked up this tintype, housed in a paper frame, in Markle, Indiana.  Writing on the back reads "Whitley Co. Ind." I find it difficult to date this tintype based on the young man's fashion.  If I had to make a guess, I would say late 1860s to mid 1870s, based on the felt hat... Continue Reading →

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