Perished at Galveston

Leverett Lewis, the sitter featured in this cabinet card photograph, was born 136 years ago on this day, February 6.  I think that makes this the perfect day to honor his life. On June 9, 1900, Leverett was living with his parents in Genoa, Ohio when he traveled fifteen miles to Toledo and enlisted in... Continue Reading →

Foot Soldier

This sitter's intense gaze is what caught my attention.  He is identified on the reverse of this carte de visite as Mr. L.G. Fisher.  From the other notations (see below) it appears this image was sent to a photographer to be enlarged.  I suspect it was for use at his funeral. Born in 1836, Linas... Continue Reading →

Charlie with the Good Hat

Charlie Nelson, the sitter in this photograph, was a butcher, which is why I decided to add this small cabinet photo to my collection.  I'm not a fan of eating meat so you would think that a photo of a butcher would be the last thing I'd be excited to find.  It's my memories of... Continue Reading →

Elysium of Bliss

I found this cabinet card in an antique shop in Blissfield, Michigan.  I was so attracted to the image of this bewitching couple that the name Rutherford B. Hayes did not register until I was home and began my research. There are plenty of biographies about the accomplishments of the 19th United States President and... Continue Reading →

Unsolved Mysteries

I picked up this carte de visite (cdv) in Wisconsin.  The photographer, Austin Kracaw, was an immigrant from Germany and operated a studio in Washington, Iowa from 1865 to 1875.  The name James McClenon is written on the reverse of this cdv.  I wasn't able to identify this sitter; however, I'd like to talk about... Continue Reading →

Secret Agent Man

Fay Savage's photo was found in a shop in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.  Based on the photo mounting (shown below) I date the photo to the late 1890s or early 1900s. Twenty-one-year-old Fay Charles Savage was living in Endicott, Nebraska in 1900.  Endicott is about 60 miles east of Nelson, where Fay sat for his photo in... Continue Reading →

He Imbibed Freely

I purchased this daguerreotype from one of my favorite Etsy shops, Glassing.  If you love old photos and want great deals, you should definitely check out Cathy's shop! The daguerreotype is the earliest commercial photography format, invented by Louis Daguerre in the 1830s.  A daguerreotype is an image on a polished silver or silver-covered copper... Continue Reading →

Don’t Toot Your Own Horn

Frank Horn worked for over twenty years at the Conn Company, a musical instrument manufacturer in Elkhart, Indiana.  I imagine he was the subject of many horn jokes in his day.  Frank was a stationary fireman, which meant he operated high-pressure steam boilers in the factory. Frank, his wife Ell (nee Seabourn), and their children... Continue Reading →

At Old Orchard

What a wonderful outdoor setting for a photograph.  But, does anything seem odd to you? Look at the way the family members are spread out.  I think the most glaring is the empty space next to the father.  Why didn't his son, or his wife for that matter, sit beside him?  Is this how the... Continue Reading →

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