Don’t call me Mozart

Harald Fredericksen, and his son, Harold Victor Byron Mozart, posed for this photo, in Chicago, Illinois. Harald immigrated to the United States, from Denmark, in 1869, and settled in Chicago, Illinois.  He married Hermina Stocker, an immigrant from Norway.  Harald worked as a clerk and bookkeeper.  The couple had three daughters, Ella, Olga, and Dagmar.  Mozart... Continue Reading →

Secret Lovers

Sarah Jane "Jennie" Gregory first said  "I do" when she was 64 years old.  She wed Theodore A. Collier, 62, in Pontiac, Michigan, on February 27, 1912.  It was his first trip to the altar, as well.  As strange as this late-in-life marriage may seem, what makes it all the more interesting is that the... Continue Reading →

Living with Hoboes

I admired this cased ambrotype, along with a smaller, cased tintype (shown at the end of this post), for at least a year, as they sat listed on etsy.  The seller mistakenly  identified the sitter as William Wallace.  He overlooked the next word, which I came to discover was the surname of Hungerford. William Wallace Hungerford... Continue Reading →

A Hell for the Sick

Jessie Calhoun's cabinet card photo was found in an album that belonged to Jessie Sylvester.  I believe the girls were cousins, as there are shared surnames in their respective family trees.  However, I was unable to find a direct link. Born in 1867, in Ashtabula county, Ohio, Jessie's father, Porter Calhoun, was a farmer, and... Continue Reading →

R.J. Terry’s Snap Shot

Born in 1860, in Alabama, Reavis Johnston "R.J." Terry was named after his father's mentors.  As a young teen, R.J.'s father, John Taliaferro Terry, lost his father and was taken in by his sister's husband, Colonel Robert Johnston.  John became a lawyer, like Johnston, and went into a law partnership with the Honorable Turner Reavis.... Continue Reading →

Blushing Brothers

The blushing brothers are George and James Harris.  Who's who is uncertain.  They were very close in age, born just two years apart; James on January 10, 1872 and George on March 10, 1874.  On George's WWI draft card, he's said to have black hair and brown eyes.  I wasn't able to locate a card... Continue Reading →

David Aker’s Snap Shot

I picked up this tintype, housed in a paper frame, in Markle, Indiana.  Writing on the back reads "Whitley Co. Ind." I find it difficult to date this tintype based on the young man's fashion.  If I had to make a guess, I would say late 1860s to mid 1870s, based on the felt hat... Continue Reading →

The Artist

This is a tintype that has been hand-colored.  It was found in Markle, Indiana.  Written on the reverse is "Mrs. Sarah Huff, Artist, Leavensworth (sic), Ind." Based on the young woman's fashion, I loosely date this photo as being taken in the 1870s.  This is a curious case, as there were several women named Sarah... Continue Reading →

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