Alma Sargent

Without a location, it was impossible to identify the sitter in this tintype, who according to the writing above her head was Alma Sargent.  Based on her tight-fitting bodice lined with buttons, Alma sat for this portrait in the mid to late 1880s. Sources: 19th Century Card Photos Kwik Guide by Gary W. Clark

A Simple Act of Common Humanity

I was brimming with excitement when I picked up this early portrait of Emily Theresa Boone of Bryantown, Maryland at a local antique mall.  I believe it's considered a chalk or pastel piece.  The artist likely completed it based on an earlier daguerreotype or ambrotype photograph.  Emily appears to be around thirteen years old which... Continue Reading →

Tales of Terrible Cruelty

This is the third and final post based on a cabinet card identified as Inez Swartz "Adrian Home girl" which was a term used to reference residents living at the Adrian Industrial School for Girls. If you'd like to read my earlier posts, they are Adrian Home Girl and As If Their Little Hearts Would... Continue Reading →

As If Their Little Hearts Would Break

This is the second post based on a cabinet card I found in a shop in Allen, Michigan.  The photo was identified as Inez Swartz "Adrian Home girl," which was a term used for residents of the Adrian Industrial School for Girls. If you'd like to see the complete cabinet card image and read my... Continue Reading →

Adrian Home Girl

The young woman who sat for this photograph is identified on the reverse as Inez Swartz.  The photographers Genevieve Dey & Grace Hayden, worked together in Hillsdale, Michigan, from 1899 to no later than 1904, which helps to date this image. The words "Adrian Home girl" penned below the name was in reference to the... Continue Reading →

Magical Mystery Tour

I found this 1890s cabinet photo in the WeepingWidow Etsy shop.  The image of the three young women is lovely however I bought it because of the location, Angola, Indiana, one of my hometowns.  I was hoping I would find lots of newspaper articles featuring the women's social activities however that was not the case. ... Continue Reading →

Hell in the Headlights

I found another example of what is often referred to as a memorial cabinet card and I am confident that this one was not created as a mourning photo or funeral handout.  The sitter, Franklin Arthur Lee, was about twenty-four years old when he stood for this portrait.  I suspect he chose this scroll frame... Continue Reading →

Three’s Company

I happened upon these three tintypes, listed individually, in the Glassing Etsy shop. As soon as I noticed that the handwriting on all three was the same I had to purchase them.  Without a location, I knew that the only hope of them being identified was to keep them together. So, what was the sitters'... Continue Reading →

Crafting in Action

As a knitter, I quickly snatched up this cabinet photo for my collection.  You can see the sitter was holding a knitting project.  I believe she was making a sock or a sleeve based on the fact that she was using a set of double pointed knitting needles that allowed her to knit in the... Continue Reading →

It’s Awful But It’s True

I found this handmade postcard while in Wisconsin. The recipient, Miss Rose Blondin, was thirteen years old in 1909 when she received this creative letter from her cousin, Josephine Peck. "Jan. 26, '09. Dear Rose. We have another cat, the biggest I ever saw weighs about 20 lbs. is gray & white his name is... Continue Reading →

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