Hattie’s Hats

Harriet Bowden, or Hattie Bowden, as she was identified on the back of this cabinet card, was born in 1869 in New York.  Sometime after 1873 her parents, William and Louisa, relocated to Ohio.  In her early twenties, when this photo was taken, Hattie worked for the Western Suspender Company and as a Milliner in... Continue Reading →

Phil Clark’s Snapshot

Philip J. Clark was a 23 year old bachelor, in August, 1872, when he sat for photographer, Samuel Montague Fassett, at 501 Wabash Avenue, in Chicago, Illinois. His birthday was in August, and I wonder if this photo was taken to mark the occasion.  Seven years later, Philip wed Miss Sarah E. Fletcher, and the... Continue Reading →

With Compliments

This carte de visite was languishing in a shop in Lansing, Michigan for at least two years.  On my latest visit, I could no longer resist the urge to rescue it.  The sitter looks to be about 20 years old, and based on his fashion, I suspect the photo was taken in the late 1870s. ... Continue Reading →

The Hope of Heaven

I fell for this cabinet card the second I saw it in The Wurdeman Studio shop.  The matching dresses, the doll, the girl pointing towards the sky, combined with the fact that the sitters were identified, pushed me to hit the add to cart button. The Frey sisters, Leah Adda (10) and Bessie J. (8), sat... Continue Reading →

Don’t call me Mozart

Harald Fredericksen, and his son, Harold Victor Byron Mozart, posed for this photo, in Chicago, Illinois. Harald immigrated to the United States, from Denmark, in 1869, and settled in Chicago, Illinois.  He married Hermina Stocker, an immigrant from Norway.  Harald worked as a clerk and bookkeeper.  The couple had three daughters, Ella, Olga, and Dagmar.  Mozart... Continue Reading →

Secret Lovers

Sarah Jane "Jennie" Gregory first said  "I do" when she was 64 years old.  She wed Theodore A. Collier, 62, in Pontiac, Michigan, on February 27, 1912.  It was his first trip to the altar, as well.  As strange as this late-in-life marriage may seem, what makes it all the more interesting is that the... Continue Reading →

Living with Hoboes

I admired this cased ambrotype, along with a smaller, cased tintype (shown at the end of this post), for at least a year, as they sat listed on etsy.  The seller mistakenly  identified the sitter as William Wallace.  He overlooked the next word, which I came to discover was the surname of Hungerford. William Wallace Hungerford... Continue Reading →

A Hell for the Sick

Jessie Calhoun's cabinet card photo was found in an album that belonged to Jessie Sylvester.  I believe the girls were cousins, as there are shared surnames in their respective family trees.  However, I was unable to find a direct link. Born in 1867, in Ashtabula county, Ohio, Jessie's father, Porter Calhoun, was a farmer, and... Continue Reading →

R.J. Terry’s Snap Shot

Born in 1860, in Alabama, Reavis Johnston "R.J." Terry was named after his father's mentors.  As a young teen, R.J.'s father, John Taliaferro Terry, lost his father and was taken in by his sister's husband, Colonel Robert Johnston.  John became a lawyer, like Johnston, and went into a law partnership with the Honorable Turner Reavis.... Continue Reading →

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