A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words

I originally bought this tintype because I'm a knitter and was immediately attracted to the knit and crochet items the girls were wearing.  However, I couldn't stop thinking about the other tintypes in the shop, all featuring the girl on the left, and how I hated for them to be separated.  Needless to say, I went back... Continue Reading →

Don’t Toot Your Own Horn

Frank Horn worked for over twenty years at the Conn Company, a musical instrument manufacturer in Elkhart, Indiana.  I imagine he was the subject of many horn jokes in his day.  Frank was a stationary fireman, which meant he operated high-pressure steam boilers in the factory. Frank, his wife Ell (nee Seabourn), and their children... Continue Reading →

At Old Orchard

What a wonderful outdoor setting for a photograph.  But, does anything seem odd to you? Look at the way the family members are spread out.  I think the most glaring is the empty space next to the father.  Why didn't his son, or his wife for that matter, sit beside him?  Is this how the... Continue Reading →

The Glass of Fashion and the Mould of Form

  I couldn't resist purchasing this carte de visite.  After all, Charles and Eliza Netsel were from my hometown, Fort Wayne, Indiana.  They are buried in Lindenwood Cemetery, also the resting place of my Great Grandparents, Chester and Grace Shenfeld. The cdv photographer, Norval Busey, opened his Baltimore, Maryland studio on Charles Street, in 1870,... Continue Reading →

The Lodger

In 1901, George Wenham was a boarder in the home of William Juby in Picton, Ontario, Canada, and based on the photo's mounting style, as well as the girl's dress, it was about that time that he sat for this photo. The photographer was W.F. Johnson of Picton. The writing on the reverse reads "Uncle... Continue Reading →

The Butcher’s Daughter

Anna Eliza Cady and I have something in common.  Our fathers were butchers.  My father worked in a grocery store meat department.  I like to imagine Anna's father, John Cady, dressed in a long, white apron, working behind the counter in a small meat market.  However, it's more likely he worked alongside many other butchers,... Continue Reading →

Grandma’s Friend

This carte de visite was a gift from a fellow collector.  I love the simplistic style.  On the back is written "Jennie Paul friend of Grandma Armstrong's."  Jennie had her image captured at the photography studio of Alexander & Stevens in Morristown, New Jersey. Jane Amanda "Jennie" Paul was 9 years old when her mother,... Continue Reading →

Expecting

Ellert Ellertson was born in Sannidal, Telemark, Norway in 1829 and traveled to America with his parents and siblings in 1843.  If you're interested, a relative has shared quite a bit of family history, which you can find at geni.com.  The focus of the relative's writing is Ellert's father, Even Ellertson, but it provides insight into... Continue Reading →

Hattie’s Hats

Harriet Bowden, or Hattie Bowden, as she was identified on the back of this cabinet card, was born in 1869 in New York.  Sometime after 1873 her parents, William and Louisa, relocated to Ohio.  In her early twenties, when this photo was taken, Hattie worked for the Western Suspender Company and as a Milliner in... Continue Reading →

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