She Bore The Burdens

I purchased this tintype on eBay.  The label on the reverse names the young women (counterclockwise) as "Sadie Sildrael, Julie Catlin, and Mattie Catlin," and it notes that Mattie had a "crippled hand."  The names are also written directly on the tintype but that writing was impossible to capture in photos and scans.  In this... Continue Reading →

Unsolved Mysteries

I picked up this carte de visite (cdv) in Wisconsin.  The photographer, Austin Kracaw, was an immigrant from Germany and operated a studio in Washington, Iowa from 1865 to 1875.  The name James McClenon is written on the reverse of this cdv.  I wasn't able to identify this sitter; however, I'd like to talk about... Continue Reading →

Secret Agent Man

Fay Savage's photo was found in a shop in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.  Based on the photo mounting (shown below) I date the photo to the late 1890s or early 1900s. Twenty-one-year-old Fay Charles Savage was living in Endicott, Nebraska in 1900.  Endicott is about 60 miles east of Nelson, where Fay sat for his photo in... Continue Reading →

The Compositor

Jennie Murray was born about 1859 in Brooklyn, New York.  She came with her parents, John and Jermana (nee Griffith) Murray, to Milwaukee sometime before the 1870 census records were collected.  Her father was an immigrant from Scotland who worked as a sailor and a watchman. At the age of 22, Jennie married William Hawkins... Continue Reading →

Not Changed, But Glorified

I purchased a mystery lot of photos from The Frozen Picture Show on Etsy.  It's a great shop that specializes in vernacular photos and antique ephemera.  If that's your kind of thing, you should definitely check them out. Written on the reverse of this image is "Winthrop Anderson in Hawley, Pauline Simpson Anderson, Hattie Simpson... Continue Reading →

He Imbibed Freely

I purchased this daguerreotype from one of my favorite Etsy shops, Glassing.  If you love old photos and want great deals, you should definitely check out Cathy's shop! The daguerreotype is the earliest commercial photography format, invented by Louis Daguerre in the 1830s.  A daguerreotype is an image on a polished silver or silver-covered copper... Continue Reading →

Fountain of Youth

Ann and Margaret Philpot, sisters born in 1857 and 1859 respectively, grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. On the 1860 census, Ann was two years of age and Margaret was 10 months old.  Their parents George and Anna (nee Nuzum) were immigrants from Ireland.  The girls had two older siblings, Thomas and Sarah. Ann and Margaret,... Continue Reading →

The Inn Keeper

This carte de visite (cdv) is the fourth photo I researched out of what I call the Waukesha album because of where I found it, Waukesha, Wisconsin.  The few photos with names written on them are children that appear to have been born about the same time period, the late 1850s to early 1860s.  If... Continue Reading →

The Pottery Maker

The Bauer sisters, Barbara, Lucinda, and Hanna, sat for this photograph at the Gustave Kundler photography studio in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  I believe the image was captured about 1875.  The girls would have been 11, 10, and two years old, respectively. I've come to surmise that the photos of the identified children found in this album... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: