Phil Clark’s Snapshot

Philip J. Clark was a 23 year old bachelor, in August, 1872, when he sat for photographer, Samuel Montague Fassett, at 501 Wabash Avenue, in Chicago, Illinois. His birthday was in August, and I wonder if this photo was taken to mark the occasion.  Seven years later, Philip wed Miss Sarah E. Fletcher, and the... Continue Reading →

With Compliments

This carte de visite was languishing in a shop in Lansing, Michigan for at least two years.  On my latest visit, I could no longer resist the urge to rescue it.  The sitter looks to be about 20 years old, and based on his fashion, I suspect the photo was taken in the late 1870s. ... Continue Reading →

Don’t call me Mozart

Harald Fredericksen, and his son, Harold Victor Byron Mozart, posed for this photo, in Chicago, Illinois. Harald immigrated to the United States, from Denmark, in 1869, and settled in Chicago, Illinois.  He married Hermina Stocker, an immigrant from Norway.  Harald worked as a clerk and bookkeeper.  The couple had three daughters, Ella, Olga, and Dagmar.  Mozart... Continue Reading →

Secret Lovers

Sarah Jane "Jennie" Gregory first said  "I do" when she was 64 years old.  She wed Theodore A. Collier, 62, in Pontiac, Michigan, on February 27, 1912.  It was his first trip to the altar, as well.  As strange as this late-in-life marriage may seem, what makes it all the more interesting is that the... Continue Reading →

R.J. Terry’s Snap Shot

Born in 1860, in Alabama, Reavis Johnston "R.J." Terry was named after his father's mentors.  As a young teen, R.J.'s father, John Taliaferro Terry, lost his father and was taken in by his sister's husband, Colonel Robert Johnston.  John became a lawyer, like Johnston, and went into a law partnership with the Honorable Turner Reavis.... Continue Reading →

Killed by the Cars

On January 27, 1890, Emma (nee Berger) Toomey, aged 26, died after being run over by a train. Almost two years later, on December 23, 1891, her husband, Michael Toomey, was also "killed by the cars."  It’s believed they were struck because they couldn’t hear the train coming, as both  Emma and Michael lost their... Continue Reading →

Sophia’s Snap Shot

Not every photo find yields a fascinating, or even a slightly interesting, story.  This isn't to say that the sitters led uneventful lives.  It just means that I've not had the pleasure of discovering their full history.  This is the first in my Snap Shot series, which will showcase those photos from my collection. Look... Continue Reading →

The Two Wives

I picked up this carte de visite, also known as a cdv, at the Markle Antique Mall in Markle, Indiana.  The words John Beck & wife were penned above the sitters’ heads. Based on the wife’s fashion and hairstyle, I loosely date the cdv to the 1870s. John Beck had two wives...no, not at the... Continue Reading →

In Mourning

This is a carte de visite, also known as a CDV, of a woman in mourning.  During the Victorian era, mourning clothes were a display of one's sorrow.  Note the black veil she is wearing. On the back of the CDV is the photographer’s information which reveals that the photo was taken by Baird on... Continue Reading →

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