Play it by Ear

Our sitter looks to be in her early teens and based on the young woman's fashion I date this CDV (carte de visite) to the early 1870s.  The photographer, Luman F. Heath, operated studios in Lansing and North Lansing from 1865 to 1903. I believe the writing penned on the reverse reads "Clara Keith" although... Continue Reading →

Florence Condit

Another wonderful image from Heather of _wherethewillowsgrow_ .  The young woman in this carte de visite sat for her portrait in Grand Rapids, Iowa.  Based on the small bit of fashion visible in the photo her image was captured in the 1870s. Miss Florence Condit, the name penned on the reverse, lived in Centralia, Illinois,... Continue Reading →

Fannie Champlin

The polka dot dress!  The swiss waist belt!  I swooned when I saw this lovely CDV photograph.  Written at the bottom is "Yours Truly Fannie I. Champlin." Frances "Fannie" was born in Montville, Connecticut in 1850.  She was the daughter of Frances Elizabeth (Smith) and Captain Frederick W. Champlin, a seaman.  By the time this... Continue Reading →

Disembodied Hand

I picked up this identified CDV from Heather on Instagram.  If you love old photos you should visit her account _wherethewillowsgrow_ .  Writing on the reverse reads "Mrs. Carolyn Bradley." Click on the above image to view full size Based on the scratches (or what are often referred to as wipes) in the portrait I... Continue Reading →

The Photographer’s Family

I purchased this carte de visite on etsy and as soon as it arrived I was flooded with emotions.  I can't quite explain the feelings I experienced but they led me to contact the seller and ask if they might have acquired any photos along with this one.  The answer was yes and I bought... Continue Reading →

Good Golly Miss Mollie

This carte de visite (cdv) was found among a group of vintage photos that once belonged to Mrs. Jimmie (McDougale) Brashier.  Written on the back is "Mollie Hart Richburg Gray."  There is no photographer or location noted which is why it's a good thing these photos managed to stay together.  I had no luck identifying... Continue Reading →

Foot Soldier

This sitter's intense gaze is what caught my attention.  He is identified on the reverse of this carte de visite as Mr. L.G. Fisher.  From the other notations (see below) it appears this image was sent to a photographer to be enlarged.  I suspect it was for use at his funeral. Born in 1836, Linas... Continue Reading →

Unsolved Mysteries

I picked up this carte de visite (cdv) in Wisconsin.  The photographer, Austin Kracaw, was an immigrant from Germany and operated a studio in Washington, Iowa from 1865 to 1875.  The name James McClenon is written on the reverse of this cdv.  I wasn't able to identify this sitter; however, I'd like to talk about... Continue Reading →

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