Hattie’s Hats

Harriet Bowden, or Hattie Bowden, as she was identified on the back of this cabinet card, was born in 1869 in New York.  Sometime after 1873 her parents, William and Louisa, relocated to Ohio.  In her early twenties, when this photo was taken, Hattie worked for the Western Suspender Company and as a Milliner in... Continue Reading →

Meet me in the Graveyard

This image was found in a basket of photos in a shop in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  I have quite a few photos of myself, as a child, visiting my mother's grave, which is why I'm drawn to photographs of others partaking in the same ritual. The visitors of Henry A. Seitz's resting place, at Lindenwood... Continue Reading →

She Wore Mittens

This is a cabinet card photograph, identified on the back as "Mabel F. Greene, 5 years old, 1883."  The photographer was W.C. Foote of Flint, Michigan.  I was attracted to the image because I'm a knitter, and the little girl is wearing knitted mittens. I imagined the mother, a grandmother, or maybe an aunt, knitting... Continue Reading →

Isabella Moore’s Snapshot

This cabinet card was a lovely gift from a fellow photo collector.  In addition to the writing on the front of the card, identifying the sitter as Mrs. Moore, a cousin from Nova Scotia, there is writing on the reverse that narrows her identity to Mrs. W. H. Moore.  I'm grateful to the relative who added... Continue Reading →

The Undertaker’s Wife

In 1896, Maggie Estella Holder, 17, married Charles Luther Thornburg, 21, and the couple settled in Farmland, Randolph County, Indiana.  Luther, as he was best known, was a farmer, but had a "hankering" to become an undertaker.  In 1904, he bought the undertaking business of W.B. Meeks, and thus began Thornburg's career as a mortician. ... Continue Reading →

Don’t call me Mozart

Harald Fredericksen, and his son, Harold Victor Byron Mozart, posed for this photo, in Chicago, Illinois. Harald immigrated to the United States, from Denmark, in 1869, and settled in Chicago, Illinois.  He married Hermina Stocker, an immigrant from Norway.  Harald worked as a clerk and bookkeeper.  The couple had three daughters, Ella, Olga, and Dagmar.  Mozart... Continue Reading →

Secret Lovers

Sarah Jane "Jennie" Gregory first said  "I do" when she was 64 years old.  She wed Theodore A. Collier, 62, in Pontiac, Michigan, on February 27, 1912.  It was his first trip to the altar, as well.  As strange as this late-in-life marriage may seem, what makes it all the more interesting is that the... Continue Reading →

Blushing Brothers

The blushing brothers are George and James Harris.  Who's who is uncertain.  They were very close in age, born just two years apart; James on January 10, 1872 and George on March 10, 1874.  On George's WWI draft card, he's said to have black hair and brown eyes.  I wasn't able to locate a card... Continue Reading →

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