So Far Lost in Manhood

I found this tintype in Coldwater, Michigan and although it's in rough condition (I digitally removed a lot of scratches from the men's faces) I couldn't pass it up.  Written on a piece of tape on the back is "J.D. Anglin and Frank McCuen - Willards Grandfather McCuen."  There was no photographer or location noted... Continue Reading →

Magical Mystery Tour

I found this 1890s cabinet photo in the WeepingWidow Etsy shop.  The image of the three young women is lovely however I bought it because of the location, Angola, Indiana, one of my hometowns.  I was hoping I would find lots of newspaper articles featuring the women's social activities however that was not the case. ... Continue Reading →

Old Maid Hanging on the Wheel

I found this photo in an antique shop and although the sticker with the sitter's name covers the information at the bottom of this cabinet card, I could see enough to recognize that the photographer was Lacey of Angola, Indiana. I gleaned from newspaper snippets that Callie Brandeberry's life was full of friends, travel, and... Continue Reading →

She Worked Hard for Her Money

It seems that Vera Norris and Bertha Whitney were no strangers to hard work.  As teenagers in the early 1900s, both girls worked as servants.  I suspect the person who wrote on the reverse of this RPPC (real photo postcard) would have positioned the names directly behind the sitter that each represented, which means Vera... Continue Reading →

Greetings from Alaska

I found this old photo in an antique mall in Auburn, Indiana.  My Grandmother was a Mary Louise so this had to come home with me.  I suspected it was a vacation photo and didn't have high hopes of identifying the sitter. Fortunately, I was wrong.  The first Mary Louise Heller I located on ancestry... Continue Reading →

Don’t Toot Your Own Horn

Frank Horn worked for over twenty years at the Conn Company, a musical instrument manufacturer in Elkhart, Indiana.  I imagine he was the subject of many horn jokes in his day.  Frank was a stationary fireman, which meant he operated high-pressure steam boilers in the factory. Frank, his wife Ell (nee Seabourn), and their children... Continue Reading →

The Glass of Fashion and the Mould of Form

  I couldn't resist purchasing this carte de visite.  After all, Charles and Eliza Netsel were from my hometown, Fort Wayne, Indiana.  They are buried in Lindenwood Cemetery, also the resting place of my Great Grandparents, Chester and Grace Shenfeld. The cdv photographer, Norval Busey, opened his Baltimore, Maryland studio on Charles Street, in 1870,... Continue Reading →

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