Greetings from Alaska

I found this old photo in an antique mall in Auburn, Indiana.  My Grandmother was a Mary Louise so this had to come home with me.  I suspected it was a vacation photo and didn't have high hopes of identifying the sitter. Fortunately, I was wrong.  The first Mary Louise Heller I located on ancestry... Continue Reading →

Don’t Toot Your Own Horn

Frank Horn worked for over twenty years at the Conn Company, a musical instrument manufacturer in Elkhart, Indiana.  I imagine he was the subject of many horn jokes in his day.  Frank was a stationary fireman, which meant he operated high-pressure steam boilers in the factory. Frank, his wife Ell (nee Seabourn), and their children... Continue Reading →

The Glass of Fashion and the Mould of Form

  I couldn't resist purchasing this carte de visite.  After all, Charles and Eliza Netsel were from my hometown, Fort Wayne, Indiana.  They are buried in Lindenwood Cemetery, also the resting place of my Great Grandparents, Chester and Grace Shenfeld. The cdv photographer, Norval Busey, opened his Baltimore, Maryland studio on Charles Street, in 1870,... Continue Reading →

Kirkley’s Snap Shot

This cabinet card was found in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  The sitter was James Buchanan Kirkley, born April 15, 1856, in Indiana.  His image was captured by Felix Schanz, a native of France, who came to Fort Wayne in the 1880s.  According to the following article, Schanz' studio, at 112 Calhoun, opened in 1889. James Kirkley... Continue Reading →

Meet me in the Graveyard

This image was found in a basket of photos in a shop in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  I have quite a few photos of myself, as a child, visiting my mother's grave, which is why I'm drawn to photographs of others partaking in the same ritual. The visitors of Henry A. Seitz's resting place, at Lindenwood... Continue Reading →

The Undertaker’s Wife

In 1896, Maggie Estella Holder, 17, married Charles Luther Thornburg, 21, and the couple settled in Farmland, Randolph County, Indiana.  Luther, as he was best known, was a farmer, but had a "hankering" to become an undertaker.  In 1904, he bought the undertaking business of W.B. Meeks, and thus began Thornburg's career as a mortician. ... Continue Reading →

David Aker’s Snap Shot

I picked up this tintype, housed in a paper frame, in Markle, Indiana.  Writing on the back reads "Whitley Co. Ind." I find it difficult to date this tintype based on the young man's fashion.  If I had to make a guess, I would say late 1860s to mid 1870s, based on the felt hat... Continue Reading →

The Hustler

This dandy cabinet card was discovered in Goshen, Indiana.  The sitter screamed, "Take me home! I'm bold and interesting!" William Francis Hostetler, born in La Paz, Indiana in 1870,  was a hustler, in a good way.  He was an enterprising person, determined to succeed, a real go-getter. Which is why I was surprised to find... Continue Reading →

Nevertheless, She Persisted

“Aunt Margret Newkirk” is written on the back of this cabinet card that was found in Auburn, Indiana. The sitter is Margaret (nee Warwick).  The inscription leads me to believe this photo belonged to Maud Kelley, a foster daughter, who lived in the Newkirk home for some years, and who fondly referred to the sitter... Continue Reading →

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