She Worked Hard for Her Money

It seems that Vera Norris and Bertha Whitney were no strangers to hard work.  As teenagers in the early 1900s, both girls worked as servants.  I suspect the person who wrote on the reverse of this RPPC (real photo postcard) would have positioned the names directly behind the sitter that each represented, which means Vera... Continue Reading →

Perished at Galveston

Leverett Lewis, the sitter featured in this cabinet card photograph, was born 136 years ago on this day, February 6.  I think that makes this the perfect day to honor his life. On June 9, 1900, Leverett was living with his parents in Genoa, Ohio when he traveled fifteen miles to Toledo and enlisted in... Continue Reading →

Elysium of Bliss

I found this cabinet card in an antique shop in Blissfield, Michigan.  I was so attracted to the image of this bewitching couple that the name Rutherford B. Hayes did not register until I was home and began my research. There are plenty of biographies about the accomplishments of the 19th United States President and... Continue Reading →

Meet me at the Church

I wasn't sure what to make of this large, 10x12, Edwardian photo found at the Maumee Antique Mall in Ohio.  Was the man a pastor of this church?  Upon reading the writing on the reverse "Edward J. Stock, Defiance, Ohio, March 1st, 1907, Rev. B. H. Morse, Pastor," I suspected this was a memorial photo... Continue Reading →

Hattie’s Hats

Harriet Bowden, or Hattie Bowden, as she was identified on the back of this cabinet card, was born in 1869 in New York.  Sometime after 1873 her parents, William and Louisa, relocated to Ohio.  In her early twenties, when this photo was taken, Hattie worked for the Western Suspender Company and as a Milliner in... Continue Reading →

A Hell for the Sick

Jessie Calhoun's cabinet card photo was found in an album that belonged to Jessie Sylvester.  I believe the girls were cousins, as there are shared surnames in their respective family trees.  However, I was unable to find a direct link. Born in 1867, in Ashtabula county, Ohio, Jessie's father, Porter Calhoun, was a farmer, and... Continue Reading →

From the Grave

Pat Cook's family portrait wound up in a sale basket in Archbold, Ohio. While the cabinet card shows a lot of wear, and the mother and daughter on the left appear ghostly pale, the overall depth and detail of the sitter's images held up well.  The balloon-like sleeves of the daughter on the right helped... Continue Reading →

Sophia’s Snap Shot

Not every photo find yields a fascinating, or even a slightly interesting, story.  This isn't to say that the sitters led uneventful lives.  It just means that I've not had the pleasure of discovering their full history.  This is the first in my Snap Shot series, which will showcase those photos from my collection. Look... Continue Reading →

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