Dead Tired Dad

The man who sat for this portrait at Leaman & Lee's Photograph and Ferrotype Gallery in Reading, Pennsylvania is identified on the reverse as George Steinmatz (sic). The image was captured in the 1870s when he was about 40 years old.  The photographer tried to liven up George's wearied look by giving his cheeks a rosy... Continue Reading →

Allie’s Snapshot

The reverse of this cabinet card photo reads "Allie Weimer, Careysville, Ohio."  Careysville was located in Champaign County, Ohio in the late 1880s which is when I believe this image was captured.  I was not able to locate an Allie Weimer in Careysville, but I do believe I've found our sitter. Miss Allie Revenaugh was... Continue Reading →

Hell in the Headlights

I found another example of what is often referred to as a memorial cabinet card and I am confident that this one was not created as a mourning photo or funeral handout.  The sitter, Franklin Arthur Lee, was about twenty-four years old when he stood for this portrait.  I suspect he chose this scroll frame... Continue Reading →

Three’s Company

I happened upon these three tintypes, listed individually, in the Glassing Etsy shop. As soon as I noticed that the handwriting on all three was the same I had to purchase them.  Without a location, I knew that the only hope of them being identified was to keep them together. So, what was the sitters'... Continue Reading →

Kissing Cousins

I found this strip of photos online at Pieces of Pastimes. I love these antique photobooth-style images and was excited about the challenge of identifying the sitters without a location.  And it definitely was a challenge!  I planned to say that I was 80% confident in my identification but then I came across what you might... Continue Reading →

Old Maid Hanging on the Wheel

I found this photo in an antique shop and although the sticker with the sitter's name covers the information at the bottom of this cabinet card, I could see enough to recognize that the photographer was Lacey of Angola, Indiana. I gleaned from newspaper snippets that Callie Brandeberry's life was full of friends, travel, and... Continue Reading →

The Higher the Hair

I love the soutache braid design on this sitter's bodice and the large brooch which appears to be made of carved shell. Although, to me, the best part and the reason I bought this photo is the identification written on the reverse! Alice was the daughter of Thomas and Selina (nee King) Hepperly.  The family... Continue Reading →

She Worked Hard for Her Money

It seems that Vera Norris and Bertha Whitney were no strangers to hard work.  As teenagers in the early 1900s, both girls worked as servants.  I suspect the person who wrote on the reverse of this RPPC (real photo postcard) would have positioned the names directly behind the sitter that each represented, which means Vera... Continue Reading →

Crafting in Action

As a knitter, I quickly snatched up this cabinet photo for my collection.  You can see the sitter was holding a knitting project.  I believe she was making a sock or a sleeve based on the fact that she was using a set of double pointed knitting needles that allowed her to knit in the... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: