She Worked Hard for Her Money

It seems that Vera Norris and Bertha Whitney were no strangers to hard work.  As teenagers in the early 1900s, both girls worked as servants.  I suspect the person who wrote on the reverse of this RPPC (real photo postcard) would have positioned the names directly behind the sitter that each represented, which means Vera... Continue Reading →

Crafting in Action

As a knitter, I quickly snatched up this cabinet photo for my collection.  You can see the sitter was holding a knitting project.  I believe she was making a sock or a sleeve based on the fact that she was using a set of double pointed knitting needles that allowed her to knit in the... Continue Reading →

It’s Awful But It’s True

I found this handmade postcard while in Wisconsin. The recipient, Miss Rose Blondin, was thirteen years old in 1909 when she received this creative letter from her cousin, Josephine Peck. "Jan. 26, '09. Dear Rose. We have another cat, the biggest I ever saw weighs about 20 lbs. is gray & white his name is... Continue Reading →

Charlie with the Good Hat

Charlie Nelson, the sitter in this photograph, was a butcher, which is why I decided to add this small cabinet photo to my collection.  I'm not a fan of eating meat so you would think that a photo of a butcher would be the last thing I'd be excited to find.  It's my memories of... Continue Reading →

Children of Corry

I suspect that the dolls in this photo were the photographer's props.  If so, I pity the person who had to pry that doll out of the hands of what appears to be an already very grumpy little girl. Featured in this cabinet card image are the children of Benjamin and Eliza (nee Porter) Dunn. ... Continue Reading →

Greetings from Alaska

I found this old photo in an antique mall in Auburn, Indiana.  My Grandmother was a Mary Louise so this had to come home with me.  I suspected it was a vacation photo and didn't have high hopes of identifying the sitter. Fortunately, I was wrong.  The first Mary Louise Heller I located on ancestry... Continue Reading →

Secret Agent Man

Fay Savage's photo was found in a shop in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.  Based on the photo mounting (shown below) I date the photo to the late 1890s or early 1900s. Twenty-one-year-old Fay Charles Savage was living in Endicott, Nebraska in 1900.  Endicott is about 60 miles east of Nelson, where Fay sat for his photo in... Continue Reading →

The Compositor

Jennie Murray was born about 1859 in Brooklyn, New York.  She came with her parents, John and Jermana (nee Griffith) Murray, to Milwaukee sometime before the 1870 census records were collected.  Her father was an immigrant from Scotland who worked as a sailor and a watchman. At the age of 22, Jennie married William Hawkins... Continue Reading →

Not Changed, But Glorified

I purchased a mystery lot of photos from The Frozen Picture Show on Etsy.  It's a great shop that specializes in vernacular photos and antique ephemera.  If that's your kind of thing, you should definitely check them out. Written on the reverse of this image is "Winthrop Anderson in Hawley, Pauline Simpson Anderson, Hattie Simpson... Continue Reading →

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