Secret Lovers

Sarah Jane "Jennie" Gregory first said  "I do" when she was 64 years old.  She wed Theodore A. Collier, 62, in Pontiac, Michigan, on February 27, 1912.  It was his first trip to the altar, as well.  As strange as this late-in-life marriage may seem, what makes it all the more interesting is that the... Continue Reading →

The Hustler

This dandy cabinet card was discovered in Goshen, Indiana.  The sitter screamed, "Take me home! I'm bold and interesting!" William Francis Hostetler, born in La Paz, Indiana in 1870,  was a hustler, in a good way.  He was an enterprising person, determined to succeed, a real go-getter. Which is why I was surprised to find... Continue Reading →

Cloudy Days Good As Sunshine

This cabinet card has so much going for it!  From the lovely studio backdrop, to the girl's big eyed, faraway stare,  to the awkward pose made to show off her dress bustle (and wow, what a bustle!)  Bustles reached extreme proportions in the mid 1880s. The back of the card is just as interesting.  The... Continue Reading →

From the Grave

Pat Cook's family portrait wound up in a sale basket in Archbold, Ohio. While the cabinet card shows a lot of wear, and the mother and daughter on the left appear ghostly pale, the overall depth and detail of the sitter's images held up well.  The balloon-like sleeves of the daughter on the right helped... Continue Reading →

Nevertheless, She Persisted

“Aunt Margret Newkirk” is written on the back of this cabinet card that was found in Auburn, Indiana. The sitter is Margaret (nee Warwick).  The inscription leads me to believe this photo belonged to Maud Kelley, a foster daughter, who lived in the Newkirk home for some years, and who fondly referred to the sitter... Continue Reading →

Killed by the Cars

On January 27, 1890, Emma (nee Berger) Toomey, aged 26, died after being run over by a train. Almost two years later, on December 23, 1891, her husband, Michael Toomey, was also "killed by the cars."  It’s believed they were struck because they couldn’t hear the train coming, as both  Emma and Michael lost their... Continue Reading →

The Stitching Girl

I picked up this beautiful tintype on etsy.  Written on the back of the pink paper sleeve that houses the image is "Annie Townsend, Mother of Nelle, Henry, Roy." Having no information about the photographer or location, I looked closely at the sitter's clothing and hairstyle, and with the help of the 19th Century Card... Continue Reading →

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