R.A. Lord, Photographer

Unfortunately this carte de visite has no identifying writing. I often buy unidentified photos in the hopes of being able to date them. Since this cdv has no lines along the border of the photo I suspected it was one of the earliest versions from 1858-1862. The fashion fit my dating hypothesis, as well as... Continue Reading →

Not a Couple

You might think you're looking at a young married couple but these sitters were siblings. A clue to this fact is the length of the young woman's dress which would have been floor length if she were considered an adult. Adam and Emma Fisher were the youngest of eight children born to John and Mary... Continue Reading →

Alma Sargent

Without a location, it was impossible to identify the sitter in this tintype, who according to the writing above her head was Alma Sargent.  Based on her tight-fitting bodice lined with buttons, Alma sat for this portrait in the mid to late 1880s. Sources: 19th Century Card Photos Kwik Guide by Gary W. Clark

Grandma Made the Dress

I picked up this cabinet card photo in Allegan, Michigan.  Although it's a lovely portrait I added it to my collection because of what was written on the back.  In addition to the Victorian couple being identified as Aunt Maude and Uncle Perry, there was a note signifying that this was their wedding day and... Continue Reading →

Palace of Flying Animals

I picked up this cabinet card photograph on Etsy.  The fashion and composition drew me in and the identification on the reverse sealed the deal.  It reads "Grace Pearce, Grace Darling Pearce, Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co, Pennsa."  And yes, she's sporting a spider brooch! Grace, born in 1869 in Pennsylvania, was the youngest of six children. ... Continue Reading →

A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words

I originally bought this tintype because I'm a knitter and was immediately attracted to the knit and crochet items the girls were wearing.  However, I couldn't stop thinking about the other tintypes in the shop, all featuring the girl on the left, and how I hated for them to be separated.  Needless to say, I went back... Continue Reading →

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