Elysium of Bliss

I found this cabinet card in an antique shop in Blissfield, Michigan.  I was so attracted to the image of this bewitching couple that the name Rutherford B. Hayes did not register until I was home and began my research. There are plenty of biographies about the accomplishments of the 19th United States President and... Continue Reading →

The Baker

Hattie was born Hedwig Reuter on June 24, 1864, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  The boy in the photo was her brother, Robert.  They were the oldest children of Jacob and Ida (nee Geier) Reuter, immigrants from Germany.  Look at their matching shoes! This carte de visite (cdv) is the second photo I researched out of what... Continue Reading →

The Butcher

This carte de visite (cdv) is out of what I've dubbed the Waukesha album because of where I found it, in Waukesha, Wisconsin.  The few photos with names written on them are children that appear to have been born about the same time as this sitter, who I've identified as Louise Ernst.  Is it just... Continue Reading →

Palace of Flying Animals

I picked up this cabinet card photograph on Etsy.  The fashion and composition drew me in and the identification on the reverse sealed the deal.  It reads "Grace Pearce, Grace Darling Pearce, Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co, Pennsa."  And yes, she's sporting a spider brooch! Grace, born in 1869 in Pennsylvania, was the youngest of six children. ... Continue Reading →

A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words

I originally bought this tintype because I'm a knitter and was immediately attracted to the knit and crochet items the girls were wearing.  However, I couldn't stop thinking about the other tintypes in the shop, all featuring the girl on the left, and how I hated for them to be separated.  Needless to say, I went back... Continue Reading →

Let the Good Times Roll

Pete and John McCarthy (left and center respectively) were brothers, two of nine known children born to Peter and Ellen Donahoue McCarthy.  The family lived in Frampton, Quebec, Canada.  As far as Jim Fitzmaurice or Fitzmorrise, although this surname may sound unusual to some, it definitely is not.  I found too many men with this name... Continue Reading →

The Butcher’s Daughter

Anna Eliza Cady and I have something in common.  Our fathers were butchers.  My father worked in a grocery store meat department.  I like to imagine Anna's father, John Cady, dressed in a long, white apron, working behind the counter in a small meat market.  However, it's more likely he worked alongside many other butchers,... Continue Reading →

Kirkley’s Snap Shot

This cabinet card was found in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  The sitter was James Buchanan Kirkley, born April 15, 1856, in Indiana.  His image was captured by Felix Schanz, a native of France, who came to Fort Wayne in the 1880s.  According to the following article, Schanz' studio, at 112 Calhoun, opened in 1889. James Kirkley... Continue Reading →

Hattie’s Hats

Harriet Bowden, or Hattie Bowden, as she was identified on the back of this cabinet card, was born in 1869 in New York.  Sometime after 1873 her parents, William and Louisa, relocated to Ohio.  In her early twenties, when this photo was taken, Hattie worked for the Western Suspender Company and as a Milliner in... Continue Reading →

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